Managing Mandriva’s /etc/resolv.conf from the CLI

There appears to be confusion in the Mandriva community about how to manage a PC using a static IP address (no DHCP client) with static nameserver entries in /etc/resolv.conf from the Linux command line interface (CLI). With newer versions of Mandriva the /etc/resolv.conf file is managed by the /sbin/resolvconf executable. There is a comment in /etc/resolv.conf to not edit the file directly as it will be overwritten.

The proper files to edit under Mandriva for /etc/resolv.conf at this point are in /var/run/resolvconf/interface/ and/or /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/. If one wants the individual interfaces, say on a laptop, to use different nameservers then edit the files in /var/run/resolvconf/interface/. Most folks use a laptop with DHCP only and thus the nameserver entries are managed automatically. There are situations where that may not be practical so this information is provided for those situations. However, for a desktop or tower PC with a static IP address one will most likely be using a single interface. Therefore one will edit the /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base file to include up to three nameserver entries. Note that the base file is only parsed if it has only lines starting with nameserver in it. Here is an example /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base file:

nameserver 10.0.0.1
nameserver 10.0.1.2
nameserver 10.1.2.3

The /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base, /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/head and /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/tail files are explained in the resolvconf man page:

/etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base

     File  containing  basic resolver information.
     The lines in this file are included in the
     resolver configuration file  even  when no
     interfaces are configured.

/etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/head

     File  to be prepended to the dynamically
     generated resolver configuration file.
     Normally this is just a comment line.

/etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/tail

     File to be appended to the dynamically
     generated  resolver  configuration file.
     To append nothing, make this an empty
     file.

If one discovers that resolvconf is being used based on the comment in the /etc/resolv.conf file then reading the man page for resolvconf can be enlightening,

New 1.11.0 Release of Crossfire RPG

A new 1.11.0 release of Crossfire RPG is available. Many bugs are fixed in this release (along with new bugs inserted more than likely). One can get the latest releases here which links to here. Most folk will just want one of the clients that allow one to connect to a crossfire server on the internet. The information in that URL is from the Crossfire RPG metaserver. The 1.11.0 Crossfire RPG servers are also designed support the new metaserver v2 which gives more information about each running server. These metaservers are what provide a list of sites to user clients about current public access Crossfire RPG servers.

The user clients available with 1.11.0 have also seen a lot of updates and bug fixes. The user clients I can currently recommend are the GTKv1 and GTKv2 clients. With GTKv2 being my current favorite. There is also a fairly new Java client that is in active development called JXclient that can be gotten here. JXclient might be easier to get running under a Microsoft Windows environment than the GTK clients. If one is running an old user client one should consider upgrading to these newer user clients.

One may also checkout the absolute latest clients and server code for the game from the SVN repository. Instructions on downloading from the SVN repository are here. Note that getting the latest code from SVN will require that one know how to compile source code. (If that sounds too scary to you then just stick to the official releases.)

Gene

This article updated: Wed Feb 13 16:57:48 UTC 2008

Crossfire the Open Source RPG

I spoke about 3D gaming under Linux in my last post here. In the words of Monty Python “And now for something completely different”.

Crossfire is a free, open source 2D tile based role playing game that, for the time being, emphasizes game play over glitz. If you are one of those shallow gamers that prefer 3D glitz over game play then Crossfire is not for you. However, if you ever played and enjoyed D&D like games that require imagination and complexity then you will probably like Crossfire.

Crossfire has a deep and rich culture, large world, multiple player roles and other great traditions coming from games like Nethack, Rogue and similar. Since Crossfire is multiplayer one has the option to play with other players on internet connected servers or to run an offline server and play alone. Playing on one’s own offline server for a while allows one to learn about the game prior to joining others on one of the public servers. The public servers provide one the chance to play with others either antagonistically or cooperatively. Depending on the server one may or may not kill other players without penalty. All the modern Crossfire servers offer team play in “parties” where the players share experience.

I have played Crossfire for several years now and am one of the map developers at this point. I also play on, and recommend playing on, Metalforge. Metalforge is the development server for official Crossfire and runs close to the latest SVN code from the 1.x branch of the game. If you want to learn more about Crossfire then feel free to point your favorite IRC software to irc.freenode.net and join the #crossfire channel.

Are you a graphic artist that would enjoy helping create art for a free multiplayer online role playing game? Crossfire can always use your assistance. You are especially invited to check out Crossfire and join us on our IRC channel.

Other URLs for Crossfire:

Gene

Thoughts on Commercial Linux Games

So there are all these 3D games for consoles and Micro$oft Window$ that are not available for Linux as native applications. I wonder why a large chunk of the gaming industry appears to still be ignoring Linux? It is not as if excellent 3D games cannot be made to run natively on a Linux box with 3D hardware. There are both Enemy Territory and Unreal Tournament 2004 for examples of these 3D games that are native for Linux. However, if I recall correctly, Unreal Tournament 2004 required one to buy the Micro$oft Window$ version and then download the Linux engine for the full game.

More currently there is Quake 4 for Linux but unfortunately the developers and distributors once again did not include Linux support “out of the box” (Of course my current hardware is not muscular enough to run Quake 4 well anyway). One must purchase a Micro$oft Window$ copy of the game first. From the Quake4 GNU/Linux FAQ: “A licensed copy of Quake 4 retail for Windows(r) is required. You will copy the assets files from it and use the CD key.” What a way to sell a game!

Personally I will never buy a game “off the shelf” that does not include a native Linux install “in the box”. Hey, developers and distributors, keep treating me and other Linux users like unwanted stepchildren and do not get my dollars. It is that simple.

Here is hoping for a sea change to add native Linux gaming “out of the box” in the gaming industry.